Favorite

No More Fillings: Scientists Discover A Way to Grow Back Tooth Enamel

I think we can all agree that going to the dentist is one of the most unpleasant experiences a human can undergo. Just thinking of the shrill whine of the dentist's drill is enough to make me cringe. Unfortunately, going to the dentist is something we all must do if we don't want to have disgusting teeth. However, there is good news: scientists have just figured out a way to grow back tooth enamel, meaning that you might never have to get another filling for those pesky cavities. Hooray!

Share
Tweet
Stumble
Pin It
Email
  • scientists putting enamel onto tooth
    Pin It

    The end to fillings? Tell us more! Researchers at the Zhejiang University in China recently discovered a way to grow back tooth enamel, as documented in the science journal Science Advances. The scientists created a gel that makes tooth enamel repair itself, meaning that fillings might become a distant memory (and good riddance).


  • lower half of smiling woman's face
    Pin It

    Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in the body, but can be eroded by acids in certain foods and drinks. Enamel is formed biologically, but  once is becomes mature, it is not able to repair itself - and this is how cavities and tooth decay are formed. According to the research paper, tooth decay is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in humans. And that's no wonder, given our high intake of sugary foods and drinks, and the high costs of visiting the dentist.


  • picture dentist hands and person opening mouth
    Pin It

    Enamel has been eluding scientists for years and it's structure was never able to be duplicated artificially. But the scientists at Zhejiang University found that mixing phosphate and calcium ions - both of which are found in enamel - with the chemical trimethylamine in an alcohol solution causes enamel to grow with the same structure at tooth enamel. 



  • picture of teeth with mirror behind them
    Pin It

    The gel succeeded in repairing the tooth within 48 hours, however the only major shortfall is that the enamel is growing back much thinner than natural, undamaged enamel. So far, the researchers have only been able to grow the enamel on a human tooth that has been removed from the mouth, but they say that tooth enamel will be tested in people's mouths in the near future. 

    Very soon we could all be regrowing our own tooth enamel. No more traumatising dentist visits. This is exciting news for anyone who has teeth. Thanks, science.

  • -
  • Vote
  • -
Share
Tweet
Stumble
Pin It
Email
  • Reposted by
  • 6taylorc1623ro1's avatar

Next on Home

We Totally Appreciate These Photos Of Baby Bats