nepal

Favorite

There's A Festival In Nepal Where They Spend The Day Worshipping Dogs And We're In Love

Kukur Tihar is our new favorite holiday! Kukar Tihar translates to the worship of dogs. Once a year in Nepal, all Nepalese dogs (home-owned and stray) receive a royal treatment! In Hindu religion, the dog is a sacred animal and are the animals that accompany us on our way to heaven -- so once a year the Nepalese dedicate a day to mankind's most loyal friend and guardian. 

During the festival, each dog gets a flower garland called a "malla" placed around their neck and their forehead is painted with a red-colored powder called "talik" or "tikka". This mark symbolizes their sacredness. 

Of course, the best part -- the feast! Various goodies ranging from cookies and fruits to cheese, meat and high-quality dog food.

And that's not all! All dogs, home-owned, stray, and police dogs then partake in a special march that marks the occasion. 

Enjoy some pictures below of the best day in Nepal!

dogs nepal kukar tihar festival beautiful - 7099653
View List
  • -
  • Vote
  • -
  • -
  • Vote
  • -



Lo, the prophecy of such a day has been foretold for eons as our ancestors trudged through the dim hallways of mortality seeking the elusive fringe of human excellence.

As generations rose and fell, banging their hopes against the jagged breakers along the bleak shore of this mortal coil, they yearned for the fulfillment of deep promises hidden within every soul's genetic labyrinth.

We found that fulfillment July 8. In the landlocked Asian nation of Nepal, a millennial hero descendant from the mountainous peaks of the Himalayas to bestow on us flawed masses a picture of perfection.



Who knows what heights we may yet scale as a species.

After this, do any heights remain?

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Disclaimer: Adult language and blood.

Western Kentucky University professor John All was conducting climate research in Nepal on Monday when he suddenly fell into a crevasse, breaking his arm, five ribs and dislocating his shoulder.

"It probably took me four or five hours to climb out. I kept moving sideways, slightly up, sideways, slightly up, until I found an area where there was enough hard snow that I could get an ax in and pull myself up and over," he told HLN's RightThisMinute.

"I knew that if I fell at any time in that entire four or five hours, I, of course, was going to fall all the way to the bottom of the crevasse. Any mistake, or any sort of rest or anything, I was going to die."

See the rest of his ordeal below:

  • -
  • Vote
  • -

Disclaimer: Adult language and blood.

Western Kentucky University professor John All was conducting climate research in Nepal on Monday when he suddenly fell into a crevasse, breaking his arm, five ribs and dislocating his shoulder.

"It probably took me four or five hours to climb out. I kept moving sideways, slightly up, sideways, slightly up, until I found an area where there was enough hard snow that I could get an ax in and pull myself up and over," he told HLN's RightThisMinute.

"I knew that if I fell at any time in that entire four or five hours, I, of course, was going to fall all the way to the bottom of the crevasse. Any mistake, or any sort of rest or anything, I was going to die."

See the rest of his ordeal below: